Haiti

In principle, the decision by House Republicans to strip the food stamp program out of the current farm bill is not a bad thing. In practice, it may not be so bad either.

For the past 40 years or so, agricultural subsidies and supplemental nutrition programs (food stamps) for poor people have been joined at the hip, the idea being that combining the two, otherwise unrelated, initiatives could help win bipartisan support for an omnibus bill that contained something for every constituency: farmers, agribusiness, advocates for the poor, etc. The problem with such an approach is that it embodied the worst of interest-group politics, legislative back scratching, and pork barrel giveaways. No liberal legislator would vote against subsidies for rich sugar or cotton or tobacco farmers for example, if it meant cuts to the food stamp program. No Florida conservative would vote to cut food stamps if it also meant cuts to subsidies for his or her rich, sugar-growing constituents. Everyone got pretty much everything they wanted, and no serious policy debate ever occurred. So separating the two makes profound sense. But encouraging a serious policy debate is the last thing on House Republicans’ minds.

In drafting and voting on a pure farm bill, House Republicans have laid bare their hypocrisy by showing, in black and white, the hollowness of their claims to budget-cutting rigor. It turns out that it’s not government spending per se they object to: as long as it benefits the wealthy, they are quite okay with it. Indeed, in drafting the new farm bill the House Republicans rejected all calls to cap or eliminate subsidies to wealthy individuals and corporations. [click to continue…]

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If any event could illustrate the fragility of the BRICS conceit, it is the recent blackout in India, which left as many as 600 million people without power for up to two days. More than anything else, it reveals the sorry state of India’s governance. Yes, there are some extenuating circumstances: an unusually hot and dry monsoon season, which has reduced the available flow in hydroelectric plants while also causing the wealthy to use more power to run their air conditioners, while at the same time farmers are using more power to run pumps bringing up irrigation water from deep wells.

But the real story is under-investment in power generation, in coal production, and in transmission and distribution infrastructure, which in turn are attributable to monopoly pricing, hugely inefficient subsidies, endemic corruption, and political stagnation. The power outage was unique only in its extent and duration. Businesses, households, and public institutions all rely on diesel generators, which to a large extent have gone from a backup to the primary source of electricity, as “load shedding” – the system of rolling blackouts that utilities impose to reduce the strain on an overtaxed network, which often deprive whole areas of a city of power for as much as 14 hours a day. The event, and the global publicity it has attracted, has put a dent in India’s self-image as a nascent superpower. India has nuclear weapons and a space program – it launched a lunar probe in 2008 and has announced plans to send an orbiter to Mars next year – but it can’t keep the lights on. [click to continue…]

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Foxconn International Holdings, the world’s largest contract manufacturer of electronic components, made notorious last year by a rash of employee suicides at its Chinese factories, recently published its half-yearly financial results, which showed that its annual labor costs per employee have risen by a third over the past year, to $2,900.

Foxconn, 71% owned by Hon Hai Precision Industry of Taipei, and which also assembles products for Sony, Dell, and Hewlett Packard, employs an estimated 400,000 people at its two factories in Shenzhen (Hon Hai, with 800,000 employees, is the 10th-largest employer in the world). These people, most of them young, many of them women, work 11-hour shifts, seven days a week. According to the New York Times, Mr. Ma Xiangqiang, a 19-year-old Foxconn employee who jumped to his death from a Foxconn dormitory in January 2010, had worked 286 hours in the month prior to his suicide, including 112 hours of overtime, more than three times the legal limit. By all accounts, Foxconn is not a fun place to work, combining some of the worst features of military service, summer camp, and prison, but the problems facing Foxconn are far from unique. [click to continue…]

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Former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier (Baby Doc) has finally broken his silence, five days after returning without warning to the country he brutally misruled for 15 years after succeeding his late father, the notorious François Duvalier, known as Papa Doc. Apparently having learned a thing or two during his 25 years of exile, Jean-Claude Duvalier was flanked by three American lawyers when he finally spoke to the press this afternoon.

In addition to several prominent Haitian lawyers, the former dictator’s legal team now includes Mike Puglise, a former Georgia policeman twice investigated for shooting people, who now specializes in representing people suing police departments; Ed Marger, another Georgia lawyer who used to represent Papa Doc; and Bob Barr, former U.S. Congressman from Georgia and the 2008 Libertarian Party Presidential candidate. [click to continue…]

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I returned to the Karibe Hotel late yesterday afternoon to find it transformed from the center of a global news event back into a quiet refuge. Jean-Claude Duvalier, the former Haitian dictator who had taken up residence at the Karibe on his return last Sunday from 25 years of exile, had slipped out discreetly. The journalists in their many-pocketed vests, the luckiest of whom had for several days crowded the hotel lobby and bar, drinking, smoking, interviewing one another, and typing away on their MacBooks, had vanished, as had the less lucky ones, camped outside. The TV sound trucks, the UN armored vehicles and troops, and the police had packed up their guns and satellite dishes and telephoto lenses and decamped. The steel gates that had been drawn across the hotel entrance had been removed, as had the security people manning them in the manner of nightclub bouncers, determining who would be allowed to come in. [click to continue…]

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